Who Are the Dalits?

Today, a new generation of Dalits is standing up for the rights of their people.

The history of the Dalits can be symbolized by a clay cup.

In 70% of India’s rural villages, members of other castes will not eat or drink with a Dalit. When a Dalit person asks for a drink, he or she is given a clay cup – which is to be crushed on the ground after use. Why? So no other person risks being polluted by it.

Due to their low position in Indian society, Dalit people are used and spent without consequence. They are raped, held captive in brothels and temple ceremonies, and forced to work as bonded laborers. Without education, without economic opportunities, without healthcare, without hope for their future.

For 3,000 years, the Dalit people of India have been considered “untouchable.” Less than human. Worthy only to be slaves, to be broken and crushed.

Today, a new generation of Dalits is standing up for the rights of their people to go to school, to be healthy, to be free. To never be called an untouchable again.

For more about Dalits, check out our Dalit 101 series.

Uneducated

Dalit families lack the educational opportunities that enable them to create a better future.
Uneducated

Unhealthy

Dalit families are denied access to proper health care and services.

Unhealthy

Impoverished

Dalit families are without a means to gain marketable skills or income.

Impoverished

The Pathway to Freedom

We are a global coalition of supporters standing with the Dalit community. Together, we mobilize people and resources to support the Dalit’s quest for a brighter future for themselves and all India.
Education
Economic Empowerment
Healthcare

For Children

Dalit children gain necessary skills in a safe, encouraging learning environment away from the hands of traffickers.

For Women

Dalit women learn valuable trade skills so they can stand independently long-term.

For Communities

Over 100 Good Shepherd Schools across India are impacting 26,000 children.

For Children

Dalit children receive education that enables them to go to college, get jobs, and break free from the cycle of poverty.

For Women

Grants empower women to start small businesses and increase income by 25% so they can support their families.

For Communities

Groups learn English and are trained in business practices for a variety of trades ranging from tailoring to electrical work.

For Children

Community health workers minister to children’s needs at local education centers.

For Women

Clinics and community health workers provide care to meet the specific needs of women’s health.

For Communities

Regional clinics provide preventive, curative, and diagnostic healthcare to Dalit communities.